News

Loyola 101

12 Sep 2017

How one should approach the first dance of the year.

   One of the things freshmen should look forward to the first dance on September 16. Dean of Men Dan Annarelli has a few tips for attending the dance.

“Being their first dance of their Loyola careers, it is a really exciting event for them. It is the one of the first huge social event that freshmen can attend. Kozakowski says it’s one of the biggest social events in Los Angeles that night. There are a couple thousand people on campus.”

When it comes to attitude, Annarelli recommends that students should be respectful, excited, and mindful of safety and rules. If you manage to break the rules, you will spend 30 minutes in the time out room.

“I want them to be excited to kickstart their career with this dance,” Annarelli said, “I want them to have a respectful attitude in terms of the school rules and especially when it comes to how they interact with the young ladies on campus.”

Annarelli also recommends taking advantage of both stages.  

“There is one stage on the docks and one stage in Malloy commons. Move around and get a lay of the land. Introduce yourself to new people and the ladies,” Annarelli said.

Here are a few tips from Dean Annarelli:

  1. Be excited  
  2. Be respectful
  3. Always be mindful of surroundings
  4. Dance appropriately and safely
  5. Take advantage of both stages.
  6. Bring ID and Ticket

 

Loyola inconveniences and how to circumvent them.

How one can replace an ID

The first piece of advice is never lose your ID. If you do lose your ID, check in with the main office. If your ID has not been turned in, I recommend you go to the Students Center. Check in with Administrative Assistant Patricia Salvaty and pay the 10 dollar ID replacement fine.

Lost a an item or found a missing object?

We all lose an item or possession such as books a few times while at Loyola. In the case of searching for the missing object, check lost and found in the main office and fill out a missing item card with one of the main office assistants. If you find your missing item in the lost and found, there is a two dollar charge to retrieve it.

Experiencing locker problems?

If you are experiencing problems with your locker, check in with main office assistant Mike Barnhill and Dean Annarelli to find a solution. Campus maintenance will meet you at your locker to open your locker. If campus maintenance determines that locker is too full of items, you will be charged a 10 dollar fine for the fix.

How to avoid being tardy.

“Life Happens,” said Annarelli. Whether it be traffic, sleeping past your alarm, missed carpool, or weather event, all Loyola students experience being tardy at least once in their careers here at Loyola. To counter this reality, students are afforded a maximum three “life happens” morning arrivals within the first 15 minutes of school. When arriving late to class, students should always check in with the main office.

Loyola downtown views

Nothing compares to Loyola High School’s views of downtown Los Angeles. From the third floor of Ardolf, one can see a panoramic view of downtown’s skyline. Despite the fact that there are numerous views from upper floors of buildings, the most iconic view is the view that comes from the bathroom on third floor Ardolf. Situated between  . The view inspires visions of industriousness and beauty in the students.

 

How to survive Caldwell

You don’t.

 

How to cope with being cut from your sport

Don’t be afraid to try new things. Loyola is a 10-foot long charcuterie plate of opportunity waiting to be munched upon and sampled. Try a new sport (maybe you’re the next Michael Phelps, who knows), join a club, start a business, or if I was your overbearing father, get a job.

 

How to live like St. Ignatius

Get your leg blown off in combat and subsequently retreat into the wilderness for months on end to find spiritual enlightenment.

 

How to make your commute to Berendo manageable

Check traffic reports beforehand. Transit time can near 45 minutes on rainy days and peak hours of slow-walking seniors.

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