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Cubs showcase photography at Caruso Catholic Center

27 Jan 2017

Photo by Jimmy Gonzalez: “Candace” by Jimmy Gonzalez was one of 15 works on display at the Caruso Catholic Center on the USC campus.

Photo by Jimmy Gonzalez: “Candace” by Jimmy Gonzalez was one of 15 works on display at the Caruso Catholic Center on the USC campus.

By Samuel Tilles

Within recent years, Loyola’s art program has fostered a plethora of contest-winning and internationally recognized artistic minds. This year’s batch of creative talent is no exception, as more than a dozen Loyola students had the opportunity to showcase their photography at the University of Southern California’s Caruso Catholic Center on Thursday, Jan. 19. The theme of the ongoing exhibition is formally entitled “Art and Spirituality,” as students were tasked with composing artwork that merges the two elements. Some of the pieces were inspired by biblical passages, while others were meant to show the importance of inner reflection and spirituality. Overall, every piece was intended to show a glimpse at spirituality’s impact upon the arts.

Several months ago, AP Studio Art instructor Cristina Saggese was approached by Anthony Bonvino, who is officially in charge of organizing all art exhibitions within the Caruso Catholic Center. Bonvino was familiar with Loyola’s art program and proposed the exhibition idea to Saggese, who readily agreed.

15 Loyola students’ black and white photographs were selected to be on display in the exhibit. They were produced by seniors Miles O’Brien Schridde, Jack Van Aken, Tim Guiteras, Chris Combs, Parker Moreno, Scotty Tamkin, Sam Marguleas, Jimmy Gonzales, Alec Zbornak, Ryan Parks, Alex Welling, Spencer Song and Max Goldman, as well as juniors Connor Listen and David Evans.

For students to exhibit their art in a public place, said Saggese, they go beyond the confines of the classroom and open their work to outsider feedback. Saggese said, “One of the biggest jobs you have in teaching art is developing creative confidence because most students don’t necessarily feel completely confident in their artistic ability.”

Four students will also have artwork on display at the Robert S. Graham Memorial High School Art Exhibit at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Downtown LA starting Jan. 22. The works on display are from seniors Duvit Kakunegoda, Hunter Carroll-Crosby and Tim Guiteras along with junior David Evans. Unlike the USC exhibit, the cathedral includes student artwork from high schools all across Los Angeles including Marymount, Archer, Crespi and others. 2017 marks the seventh year Loyola students have contributed work to the cathedral’s showcase of high school artistic talent. The theme for the cathedral’s exhibit is also “Art and Spirituality.”

Evans said, “To have my work displayed anywhere is a huge honor. It makes me feel as though I am a professional photographer and yet I’m just a student. To have this opportunity makes me want to show more of my work to the world and work towards improvement.”

The importance of sharing an inner voice is at the heart and soul of the Loyola art program, said Saggese. “We [at Loyola] try to emphasize that your voice is important, and what better way to do that than by sharing it with the world?” Saggese said.  

The artwork will be on display for several months at both the Caruso Catholic Center and at Our Lady of the Angels Cathedral.

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